Sass – Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets

Sass makes CSS fun again. Sass is an extension of CSS3, adding nested rules, variables, mixins, selector inheritance, and more. It’s translated to well-formatted, standard CSS using the command line tool or a web-framework plugin.

Sass has two syntaxes. The new main syntax (as of Sass 3) is known as “SCSS” (for “Sassy CSS”), and is a superset of CSS3’s syntax. This means that every valid CSS3 stylesheet is valid SCSS as well. SCSS files use the extension .scss.

The second, older syntax is known as the indented syntax (or just “Sass”). Inspired by Haml’s terseness, it’s intended for people who prefer conciseness over similarity to CSS. Instead of brackets and semicolons, it uses the indentation of lines to specify blocks. Although no longer the primary syntax, the indented syntax will continue to be supported. Files in the indented syntax use the extension .sass.

Welcome to The Document Foundation! – The Document Foundation

It is an independent self-governing meritocratic Foundation, created by leading members of the OpenOffice.org Community.
It continues to build on the foundation of ten years' dedicated work by the OpenOffice.org Community.
It was created in the belief that the culture born of an independent Foundation brings out the best in contributors and will deliver the best software for users.
It is open to any individual who agrees with our core values and contributes to our activities.
It welcomes corporate participation, e.g. by sponsoring individuals to work as equals alongside other contributors in the community.

Linux-HA

The Linux-HA project maintains a set of building blocks for high availability cluster systems, including a cluster messaging layer, a huge number of resource agents for a variety of applications, and a plumbing library and error reporting toolkit.

You usually want to deploy the Pacemaker Cluster Resource Manager on top of the Heartbeat infrastructure layer. If you happen to be still under the impression that this CRM would be part of Heartbeat, please see Why was the Pacemaker Project Created?

Main

Nginx is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server and reverse proxy, as well as an IMAP/POP3 proxy server. Igor Sysoev started development of Nginx in 2002, with the first public release in 2004. Nginx now hosts nearly 6.55% (13.5M) of all domains worldwide.

Nginx is known for its high performance, stability, rich feature set, simple configuration, and low resource consumption.

Nginx is one of a handful of servers written to address the C10K problem. Unlike traditional servers, Nginx doesn't rely on threads to handle requests. Instead it uses a much more scalable event-driven (asynchronous) architecture. This architecture uses small, but more importantly, predictable amounts of memory under load.
Even if you don't expect to handle thousands of simultaneous requests, you can still benefit from Nginx's high-performance and small memory footprint. Nginx scales in all directions: from the smallest VPS all the way up to clusters of servers.

KTCPVS – LVSKB

KTCPVS stands for Kernel TCP Virtual Server. It implements application-level load balancing inside the Linux kernel, so called Layer-7 switching. Since the overhead of layer-7 switching in user-space is very high, it is good to implement it inside the kernel in order to avoid the overhead of context switching and memory copying between user-space and kernel-space. Although the scalability of KTCPVS is lower than that of IPVS (IP Virtual Server), it is flexible, because the content of request is known before the request is redirected to one server.

LVS NAT + Keepalived HOWTO

"The main goal of the keepalived project is to add a strong & robust keepalive facility to the Linux Virtual Server project. This project is written in C with multilayer TCP/IP stack checks. Keepalived implements a framework based on three family checks : Layer3, Layer4 & Layer5. This framework gives the daemon the ability of checking a LVS server pool states. When one of the server of the LVS server pool is down, keepalived informs the linux kernel via a setsockopt call to remove this server entrie from the LVS topology. In addition keepalived implements a VRRPv2 stack to handle director failover. So in short keepalived is a userspace daemon for LVS cluster nodes healthchecks and LVS directors failover.

DRBD:What is DRBD

DRBD® refers to block devices designed as a building block to form high availability (HA) clusters. This is done by mirroring a whole block device via an assigned network. DRBD can be understood as network based raid-1.

In the illustration above, the two orange boxes represent two servers that form an HA cluster. The boxes contain the usual components of a Linux™ kernel: file system, buffer cache, disk scheduler, disk drivers, TCP/IP stack and network interface card (NIC) driver. The black arrows illustrate the flow of data between these components.

The orange arrows show the flow of data, as DRBD mirrors the data of a high availably service from the active node of the HA cluster to the standby node of the HA cluster.

Failover and loadbalancer using keepalived (LVS) on two machines

Failover and loadbalancer using keepalived (LVS) on two machines
January 26th, 2009
28 comments

In this scenario, we have two machines and try to make the most of available resources. Each of the node will play the role of realserver, it will provide a service such as a web or a mail server. At the same time, one of the machines will loadbalance the requests to itself and to its neighbor. The node that is responsible of the loadbalancing owns the VIP. Every client connects to it transparently thanks to the VIP. The other node is also able to take over the VIP if it detects that current master failed but in nominal case only process requests forwarded by the loadbalancer.