OPDS Catalogs version 1.0 release

The open ebook community and the Internet Archive are pleased to announce the release of the first production version of the Open Publication Distribution System (OPDS) Catalog format for digital content. OPDS Catalogs are an open standard designed to enable the discovery of digital content from any location, on any device, and for any application.

The specification is available at: http://opds-spec.org/specs/opds-catalog-1-0.

TEI @ Oxford Summer School 2010

The TEI @ Oxford Summer School is a three day course introducing the recommendations of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) for encoding of digital text. It combines in-depth coverage of the latest version of the TEI Recommendations for the encoding of digital text with practical workshops on related technologies. It includes an introduction to mark-up, explanations of the TEI Guidelines, and approaches to publishing TEI texts. Practical exercises expose you hands-on experience of a wide range of TEI customisation, editing, and publication.

Symposium on TEI and Scholarly Publishing | Digital Humanities Observatory

This symposium, to be held in conjunction with a meeting of the TEI Council, will explore such questions through a series of presentations outlining the current state of the art in institutional publishing operations such as those of universities in the UK, France, US, and Australia, from the point of view of private sector publishers (among which the NLM DTDs are increasingly adopted), and from international initiatives where interoperability has been identified as a major factor (e.g., PEER, which includes European research institutions, repositories, and STM publishers). The objective is to identify current difficulties in making publication systems interoperable and identify priority actions for the TEI to intervene in this arena.

ENRICH Project and TEI P5 | ENRICH

Article on TEI P5 development and use in frame of ENRICH project by James Cummings and Lou Burnard, Oxford University

There are several quite distinct traditions for the description of primary sources, in particular manuscripts. Unlike books, such sources are unique objects, often of great cultural value, which are typically catalogued locally by the many different institutions holding them. This contributes further to the diversity of approaches taken. Great institutions are able to produce richly detailed, highly scholarly descriptions, while smaller or less well-resourced institutions cannot hope to do so. But with the widespread increase in the practice of digitization of such primary sources, there is increasing pressure to make their cataloguing uniform, so as to facilitate cross-site searching, and the sharing of information about resources held at many different institutions.

The CoverPages | Online ressource for markup language technologies

ABOUT

The Cover Pages is a comprehensive, online reference collection supporting the XML family of markup language standards, XML vocabularies, and related structured information standards. Edited by Robin Cover since 1986, this public access knowledgebase promotes and enables the use of open, interoperable, standards-based solutions which protect digital information and enhance the quality of data processing.

The Cover Pages web site provides reference material on enabling technologies compatible with SGML/XML descriptive markup language standards and applications: object modeling, semantic nets, ontologies, authority lists, document production systems, and conceptual modeling. It also supplies references for social aspects of distributed and public sector concerns: privacy, open standards, patented technology embedded in standards, etc. NB. This statement and the resource itself are works in progress, subject to continuous revision.