Main

Nginx is a free, open-source, high-performance HTTP server and reverse proxy, as well as an IMAP/POP3 proxy server. Igor Sysoev started development of Nginx in 2002, with the first public release in 2004. Nginx now hosts nearly 6.55% (13.5M) of all domains worldwide.

Nginx is known for its high performance, stability, rich feature set, simple configuration, and low resource consumption.

Nginx is one of a handful of servers written to address the C10K problem. Unlike traditional servers, Nginx doesn't rely on threads to handle requests. Instead it uses a much more scalable event-driven (asynchronous) architecture. This architecture uses small, but more importantly, predictable amounts of memory under load.
Even if you don't expect to handle thousands of simultaneous requests, you can still benefit from Nginx's high-performance and small memory footprint. Nginx scales in all directions: from the smallest VPS all the way up to clusters of servers.

Scaling Lucene and Solr | Enterprise Search support for Apache Lucene and Solr by Lucid Imagination

While many Lucene/Solr applications will never outgrow a single, well-configured machine, the fact is, more and more applications are pushing beyond the single machine limit due to either index size or query volume. In discussing Lucene and Solr best practices for performance and scaling, Mark Miller explains how to get the most out of a single machine, as well as how to scale out to harness multiple machines to handle large indexes, large query volume, or both.

Mozilla Notes on HTML Reflow

Reflow is the process by which the geometry of the layout engine's formatting objects are computed. The HTML formatting objects are called frames: a frame corresponds to the geometric information for (roughly) a single element in the content model; the frames are arranged into a hierarchy that parallels the containment hierarchy in the content model. A frame is rectangular, with width, height, and an offset from the parent frame that contains it.

Efficient JavaScript – Opera Developer Community

Repaint – also known as redraw – is what happens whenever something is made visible when it was not previously visible, or vice versa, without altering the layout of the document. An example would be when adding an outline to an element, changing the background color, or changing the visibility style. Repaint is expensive in terms of performance, as it requires the engine to search through all elements to determine what is visible, and what should be displayed.

Stubbornella » Blog Archive » Reflows & Repaints: CSS Performance making your JavaScript slow?

Going forward the performance community needs to partner more with browser vendors in addition to our more typical black box experiments. Browser makers know what is costly or irrelevant in terms of performance. Opera lists repaint and reflow as one of the three main contributors to sluggish JavaScript, so it definitely seems worth a look.